FESIN 2008 - ECOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA MEETING

 

 

Please Note:  We will post workshop talks as we receive them.  To see individual talks, scroll down to the speaker you are interested in.

 

ESA WORKSHOP WK-2: Molecular Tools for Assessing Fungal Biodiversity (August 2)

ESA WORKSHOP WK-10: Sampling Fungi from the Environment (August 3)

ESA ORGANIZED ORAL SESSION: Frontiers In The Ecology Of Plant-Fungal Interactions (August 5 - NOTE DATE CHANGE)

Also of interest to FESIN participants

MSA SYMPOSIUM: Fungal Biodiversity Informatics

 

ESA WORKSHOP 1 ( SATURDAY, AUGUST 2, 2008)

MOLECULAR TOOLS FOR ASSESSING FUNGAL BIODIVERSITY 

Organizers:

Dr. Jeri Parrent, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Integrative Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1, Canada
Tel:
519-824-4120 x56009  e-mail:jparrent@uoguelph.ca

Dr. Catherine Gehring, Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona 86011-5640, (928)523-9158, e-mail: Catherine.Gehring@nau.edu, .

Dr. Thomas Bruns, Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

University of California, Berkeley California 94720-3102, (510) 642-7987,  email: pogon@berkeley.edu  

 

One of the barriers to inclusion of fungi in ecological research is the difficulty of identifying fungi from environmental samples.  FESIN proposes a full day workshop on the use of molecular tools to assess fungal biodiversity.  This workshop will target ecologists interested in working with fungi who have limited familiarity with molecular approaches.  It will include presentations by leaders in the field and opportunities for discussion and informal interaction to promote collaboration. 

MORNING SESSION INTRODUCTION TO METHODS

8:30 AM Intro to session       
8:45 AM    Introduction to major fungal lineages and symbionts     Mary Berbee
9:30 AM      Molecular approaches for studying fungi in the environment   Jeri Parrent (Reference List)
10:15 AM    Coffee
10:30 AM        TRFLP acquisition, analysis and interpretation Ian Dickie
11:00 AM      Special problems associated with sampling VA mycorrhizal fungi Shannon Scheckter (Handout)
11:30 AM       Discussion of general methods 

Lunch on your own

 

AFTERNOON SESSION CHALLENGES AND NEW TECHNOLOGIES

 1:00 PM Massively Parallel sequencing   Ari Jumponnen (Reference List)
1:30 PM    Illumina-based signature sequencing of forest soil microbial communities        Cedar Hesse
2:00 PM     Computer tools used for complex data queries of sequence databases      Jason Stajich
2:30 AM    Coffee 
2:45 PM Sampling from the environment - issues regarding spatial scale  Ian Alexander
3:15 PM    Sampling from the environment -  the problem of hyperdiversity  Brendan Bohannan
3:45 PM Sampling functional genes in ecological studies Chris Schadt (Reference List)


ESA WORKSHOP 2 (SUNDAY, AUGUST 3, 2008)

SAMPLING FUNGI FROM THE ENVIRONMENT CHALLENGES AND SOLUTIONS

 

Dr. Thomas Bruns, Department of Plant and Microbial Biology,   University of California, Berkeley California 94720-3102, (510) 642-7987, email: pogon@berkeley.edu

Dr. Karen Hughes, Department of Botany, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1100. (865) 974-2256, e-mail: khughes@utk.edu;

Dr. Betsy Arnold, Department of Plant Sciences, The University of Arizona
Tucson, AZ 85721, arnold@ag.arizona.edu

Dr. Jeri Parrent, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Integrative Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1, Canada
Tel:
519-824-4120 x56009  e-mail:jparrent@uoguelph.ca

Dr. Catherine Gehring, Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona 86011-5640, (928)523-9158, e-mail: Catherine.Gehring@nau.edu

 

This is a full day workshop for ecologists with some experience using molecular approaches for identification of microbes.  The goals of the workshop are to highlight the key challenges of identifying fungi collected in field studies and to work towards the development of strategies to overcome those challenges. The workshop will include introductions to the challenges from both ecological and molecular genetic perspectives and guided discussion among workshop participants to address the following questions:  1. What are the limitations of rRNA genes and spacers for identification and what other loci might be used to supplement them?, 2.  How can we precisely, accurately, and efficiently identify and name environmental sequences of unknown fungi?, 3.  What are the gaps in current sequence databases, and how can we generate data to fill those gaps?, and 4. How should we curate and organize environmental samples and the data derived from them?  The workshop will include short presentations, guided discussion and the creation of a draft synthesis of suggested methods. 

 

MORNING SESSION   Questions 1 and 2

      8:30 AM Limitations of current sequence data in fungal taxa and guilds  Rytas Vilgayls
9:00 AM   Metadata needed for Environmental sequences     Betsy Arnold
9:30 AM     Classifying Environmental Sequences  - why its necessary and what needs to be done      Tom Bruns
10:00 AM       Discussion of sequence Classification/ Data issues     
10:20 AM        Coffee
10:40 AM        Ideas for Automated identification of fungal OTUs      David Hibbett
11:10 AM   Automated classification and ideas for expansion of RDB to fungal ITS  Jim Cole
11:40 AM        discussion of automated classification issues 
12:00 PM        Lunch 
 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

 

1:00 AM Fungi as part of an integrated microbial community      Noah Fierer
1:30 AM      Nanotechnological and molecular approaches for studying fungal activity     Kathleen Treseder
2:00 AM        Multilocus identification of environmental samples - How can we move beyond rDNA loci and maintain and organismal focus?        Discussion

2:30 AM Coffee 

2:45 AM FESIN steering committee meeting       

 

ESA ORGANIZED ORAL SESSION: FRONTIERS IN THE ECOLOGY OF PLANT-FUNGAL INTERACTIONS

This session represents a synthetic approach to understanding the state of the field, and future directions, in fungal ecology. The diversity of speakers will address complementary but distinct areas of research, and will help to bridge the gap between ecologists and fungal biologists. As an oral session at the 'frontiers' of fungal ecology, we hope to showcase innovative and original work, and at least one presentation will specifically refer to work conducted in collaboration with a Native American Tribal College.

 

ORGANIZER

Elizabeth Arnold

Department of Plant Sciences

University of Arizona

Department of Plant Sciences

Tucson, AZ 85721

Phone Number: 520-621-7212

Email: arnold@ag.arizona.edu

 

Moderator

Jeri L. Parrent

Department of Integrative Biology

University of Guelph

Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1, Canada

Phone: 519-824-4120 x56009

Email: jparrent@uoguelph.ca

 

Ecology of Plant-Pathogen Interactions in the Context of Global Change  Bitty A. Roy, University of Oregon

The Influence of Nitrogen Deposition on Fungal Decomposition in Forest Communities

Ecological Consequences of Three-way Symbioses: Plants, Fungal Endophytes, and Viruses Regina S. Redman, Montana State University

Bacterial Endosymbionts Within Fungal Endosymbionts: Consequences for the Ecology of Plant-Fungal Interactions Elizabeth Arnold, University of Arizona

Mutualists As Invaders: The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly Anne Pringle, Harvard University

The Role of Plant Root Architecture and Functional Diversity among Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Plant-pathogen-mycorrhizal Interactions Ben Sikes, University of Guelph

Biogeography, Temporal Variation, and the Ecology of Ectomycorrhizal Fungal Communities Ian Alexander, University of Aberdeen

What does rRNA Teach Us About Fungal Ecology? Ari Jumpponen, Kansas State University

Two additional slots to be filled by Program Chair